PDA

Archiv verlassen und diese Seite im Standarddesign anzeigen : Neue Beiträge im Discussion of Rosetta@home Journal



Gast09072017f
21.08.2009, 16:46
hier kommen interessante beiträge aus dem "Discussion of Rosetta@home Journal" thread von rosetta


beitrag von mod.sense


For those that have not heard the term before, I believe that the "phase problem" Dr. Baker referred to in his last post is where specific atoms within the protein are in a sort of unstable or orbiting state where they aren't in a fixed position. This throws off the existing methods of prediction because they get a larger then expected fuzzy area and aren't certain what to make of it.

Perhaps Dr. Baker or others can expound on the basics of the problem being solved when they've dug through the influx of EMails their results have generated.

But, in laymen's terms, what he is saying is that the existing prediction methods of crystallizing and x-raying (or NMR) a protein failed to accurately predict the shape. I presume the Rosetta fold and dock protocol was using the scan data as one of it's inputs. And so the program was able to use the scan data and produce a more complete and accurate structure than the existing methods were able to do with the same data.

For some very interesting background, reading in layperson's language, here is a link to an article in Wried from 2001, on the existing x-ray methods of structure prediction. Understand that there is still several weeks of manual work required after the X-rays are taken to interpret the fuzzy blobs that result and reveal the structure. Also, the article was written with just a single protein in mind, but Dr. Baker is discussion a case where there are two of them bound together.

The ultimate goal of Rosetta is to predict the structure using only the chemical sequence of the protein as input. The chemical sequence is much more easily obtained then the X-ray crystallography. But using Rosetta to accurately interpret the X-ray data, and reliably eliminate the weeks of manual work done after the X-ray data is gathered will be a great stride forward.

Understanding how proteins bind together is how treatments will be made for disease. How a protein behaves in the body or it's environment has everything to do with it's shape. And if you bind another protein to it, you have changed it's shape and it will no longer be able to function in the way it did before. So if you bind a strand on to a flu virus, it will no longer behave like the flu virus. You still must study and understand what behavior it does have after binding with your agent, confirming that it doesn't become something somehow worse. But generally, if you can bind to it, you've disabled it and the person no longer has the flu, or HIV, or other disease.

This is why you don't often see statements from the Project Team about "we're working on cancer (or HIV, or the flu) today". Because most of what they are trying to do is master the fundamentals science required to combat all of these things. If you study just one protein to death (pardon the pun!) you will likely devise a program that does not accurately solve other proteins. This is why you study proteins from E. Coli, or snake venom and a suite of others that sound unrelated to HIV and cancer. And you do it each time you make revisions to the program. Others have already solved these protein structures, but they still don't know how to solve it using just the chemical sequence and a computer model. And they still don't have a complete and reliable understanding of how to use that knowledge to make a cure for these diseases.

There are probably some small inaccuracies, or better ways to make my statements here. I am not a protein scientist, just a very enthusiastic message board volunteer. I hope I've shed some light on why Rosetta@home is important. And perhaps part of why it is hard to explain sometimes. It's just not as simple as "we're working on cancer this week". I hope you find this information useful and others with more technical knowledge will use this as a basis for further clarification.

Gast09072017f
27.04.2010, 22:25
hier kommen interessante beiträge aus dem "Discussion of Rosetta@home Journal" thread von rosetta

Eine Frage von Rui Pinheiro Posted 23 Apr 2010 14:59:26


ello all,

Well, im a chemical engineer from portugal, i always liked the concept of computing @ home for a global project such as this one.

Even tough im a chemical engineer, my work days are spent dealing with energy but at a much different scale.

I have a (very very simple) question that came from what i just have read in Dr. Bakers posts:

Does this mean we all probably have made a very huge step towards irradicate conditions just like the common flu?

If so... thats huge! Am i right?

gab dazu bisher 2 antworten einmal von

Mod.Sense Posted 25 Apr 2010 14:32:16




More significantly (in my mind) it means (once confirmed in the lab) that we (mankind) are on the verge of being able to address viral threats that emerge in the future... before they take their toll on world population.

It is one thing to be able to develop a vaccine for something like polio or small pox... it is quite another to be able to create a vaccine BEFORE the disease impacts thousands of people's lives.

I am not certain if Dr. Baker would describe what they've devised as a vaccine, or a treatment. But it shows the timeframe from disease outbreak to medical response is potentially shortening.

Even for the seasonal flu shots, the timeline from discovery of the latest strains likely to impact humans, to development and mass production of vaccine is long enough that the virus may change itself and rendure the shots ineffective. Shortening this outbreak to response window is significant.

und die zweite antwort auf die frage ist von David Baker selbst (Posted 27 Apr 2010 7:18:01)


Being able to rapidly design proteins which bind to and neutralize viruses and other pathogens would definitely be a significant step towards being able to control future epidemics. However, in itself it is not a complete solution because there is a problem in making enough of the designed proteins to give to people--each person would need a lot of protein and there are lots of people!

We are also working on designing new vaccines, but the flu virus binder is not a vaccine, it is a virus blocker. vaccines work by mimicking the virus so your body makes antibodies in advance that can then neutralize the virus if you get infected later. the designed protein, if you had enough of it, should block the flu virus from getting into your cells after you had been exposed; a vaccine cannot do this.

One additional problem is that the designed protein may elicit an antibody response from people who are treated with it. in this case, it could be a one time treatment but not used chronically.

Finally-with CASP9 starting and more flu virus and other pathogen binder design projects ramping up--we are really limited by CPU time--please spread the word.

thanks!

David

Gast09072017f
29.04.2010, 16:57
hier eine übersetzung von susanne aus dem seti.germany forum



Eine Frage von Rui Pinheiro Posted 23 Apr 2010 14:59:26
Seid gegrü?t,

Also, ich bin ein Chemieingenieur aus Portugal, habe auch immer das Konzept des computierens @home für ein globales Projekt wie dieses befürwortet.

Obwohl ich ein Chemieingenieur bin, beschäftige ich mich am Arbeitsplatz mit ganz anderen Energiewerten.

Ich habe eine (ganz, ganz einfache) Frage betrefflich der Posts, die ich gerade von Dr Baker gelesen habe:

Ist damit gemeint, dass wir höchstwahrscheinlich einen Riesenschritt in Richtung Beseitigung von Krankheiten wie die allgemeine Grippe getan haben?

Wenn das so ist …. das ist phenomenal! Hab ich recht?


Mod.Sense Posted 25 Apr 2010 14:32:16
Zitat:
Viel wichtiger (meiner Meinung nach) ist (sobald vom Labor bestätigt), dass wir (Menschheit) auf der Schwelle stehen zukünftliche Bedrohungen durch Viren konfrontieren zu können … ehe sie einen hohen Tribut an Menschenleben fördern.

Es ist aber etwas ganz anderes Impfstoffe für etwa Kinderlähmung oder Pocken zu entwickeln …als wie einen Impfstoff zu erstellen EHE die Krankheit tausende von Menschenleben bedroht.

Ich bin mir nicht sicher ob Dr Baker seinen Durchbruch as Impfstoff beschreiben würde, oder als Behandlung. Aber es zeigt an, das der Zeitraum vom Ausbrechen einer Krankheit bis zur medizinischen Reaktion im Begriff ist, sich möglicherweise zu verkürzen.

Was die saisonale Grippeimpfung betrifft: - der Zeitraum von der Entdeckung der aktuellen Stämme, die Auswirkungen auf die Menschen haben könnten, bis hin zur Entwicklung und Massenproduktion der Impfstoffe, ist lang genug, dass der Virus sich verändern und somit die Impfungen ineffektiv machen könnte. Die Verkürzung des Zeitraums vom Ausbruch bis zur Gegenreaktion ist bedeutend.


und die zweite Antwort auf die Frage ist von David Baker selbst (Posted 27 Apr 2010 7:18:01)
Zitat:
Die Fähigkeit haben schnell Proteine zu erzeugen, die sich an die Viren binden und sie und andere Krankheitserreger somit neutralisieren, wäre sicherlich ein bedeutender Schritt um kommende Seuchen bekämpfen zu können. Jedoch ist es allein nicht als komplette Lösung zu sehen, denn das Erzeugen von ausreichenden Mengen von den benötigten Designproteinen um sie der Menschheit verabreichen zu können ist problematisch – jede Person bräuchte Unmengen von Proteinen und es gibt dazu halt eben viele Menschen!

Wir arbeiten auch an neuen Impfstoffen, aber der Grippevirusbinder ist kein Impfstoff, er ist ein Virusblockierer. Impfstoffe sind effektiv weil sie den Virus nachahmen, sodass der Körper zeitlich Abwehrstoffe produzieren kann, welche dann die Viren neutralisieren, solltest du ihnen ausgesetzt sein. Hättest du genug von den Designproteinen, würden diese verhindern, dass der Grippevirus nach Infektion in die Zellwand eindringen kann, ein Impfstoff kann das nicht.

Ein weiteres Problem ist, dass das Designprotein in Leuten, die damit behandelt wurden, eine Antikörperreaktion hervorrufen könnte. In solchen Fällen müsste man die Behandlung als einmalig, anstatt langwierig, sehen.

Abschlie?end – mit dem Beginn von CASP9 und einem Anstau an weiteren Grippeviren - und anderen Krankheitserregerprojekten – sind wir sehr von dem CPU Limit eingeengt – bitte sagt es weiter.

Danke

David

Gast09072017f
06.05.2010, 19:35
neue beiträge



folgender Post erschien von J Langley bezgl. des Beitrags von David Baker in seinem Journal vom 30.4.10
Message 65909 - Posted 30 Apr 2010 18:30:03 UTC

"Will the energy WUs be handled by a separate application?
And if so, will users be able to choose which applications they receive WUs for?
And who owns the IP rights for what R@H might develop / discover in this sub-project?"

Übersetzung: -
Werden die Energie-WUs dann von einer separaten Applikation gehandhabt?
Und wenn ja, wird es den Benutzern möglich sein für welche Applikation sie die WUs bekommen?
Und wer besitzt die IP Rechte für das, was R@H in diesem Subprojekt entwickelt/entdeckt?


Dazu David Baker’s Antwort, Post vom 4. Mai 2010

"Currently we do not plan to run many energy WUs on rosetta@home -- it will likely be less than 1% of the total. if later these calculations become more CPU demanding we will figure out how to give users the ability to choose. the IP rights for all of our research belong to public institutions like the university of washington."

Übersetzung: -
Im Moment haben wir nicht vor viele Energy WUs auf rosetta@home laufen zu lassen – es wird höchstwahrscheinlich weniger als 1% im ganzen ausmachen. Sollten dann diese Kalkulationen zu einem späteren Zeitpunk mehr von der CPU verlangen, werden wir uns etwas einfallen lassen, damit die Benutzer die Wahl treffen können. Die IP Rechte für unsere Forschung gehört öffentlichen Instituten wie die Universität zu Washington.

Gast09072017f
17.05.2010, 18:17
auch hier ein neuer beitrag


Posted 17 May 2010 3:39:26 UTC von Mod.Zilla

Great to see the almost 34% increase in computing power for the project! I hope many of the new users will stick around even after CASP9 is over, as Rosetta@home is truly a great project with huge potential to help humanity.
____________
Übersetzung von susanne

Es ist gro?artig den fast 34%igen Zuwachs an Computerkraft für dieses Projekt zu beobachten! Ich hoffe dass viele der neuen Benutzer auch nach CASP9 noch dabeibleiben, denn Rosetta@home ist wirklich ein bedeutendes Projekt mit einem riesigen Potential der Menschheit zu helfen.

Gast09072017f
22.07.2010, 10:15
ich hab die sache mal aus dem stei forum übernommen, liest ja nicht jeder da

Michael G.R. postete dort am 21.5.10
Sadly, it looks like most of the recent gains have been lost. Too bad it didn't at least last for the duration of CASP 9.
____________
Übersetzung: -
Leider sieht es so aus als wenn der kürzliche Zuwachs verloren ist. Ist halt schade, dass es nicht wenigstens bis zum Ende von CASP9 dauerte.

In Antwort darauf schrieb [FVG]bax auch am 21.5.10

recent flops peak was due undoubtly to big teams massive involvement in SG Pentathlon challenge

Is this "sad but true"? No. Pentathlon challenge was maybe the best ever team challenge. Chapeaux to SETI.Germany for it!

Can we use this "challenge feeling" to increase Rosetta@home support at least till the end of CASP9? Don't know how... a Rosetta's specific challenge? CASP badges?

Übersetzung: -

Letzter Flops Höhepunkt war ohne Zweifel darauf zurückzuführen, dass gro?e Teams massiv beim SG Pentathlon engagiert waren.

Ist das wirklich “traurig aber wahr”? Nein. Pentathlon Challenge war vielleicht das je beste Teamchallenge aller Zeiten. Hut ab vor SETI.Germany!

Könnten wir dieses “Challengegefühl” dazu nutzen die Unterstützung von Rosetta@home wenigstens bis zum Ende von CASP9 zu erhöhen? Wei? aber nicht wie ……. Eine Challenge speziell für Rosetta? CASP badges?


6 Damit ihr auch hier auf dem Laufenden seid, habe ich nun alles vom 22. Mai bis 1. Juli übersetzt, aber der Übersicht halber nur den deutschen Text hier gepostet (englischspr Posts bitte hier nachlesen http://boinc.bakerlab.org/rosetta/fo...ad.php?id=4408 ) Die 5stelligen Referenznummern sind die der Originalposts.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
22/05/10 JChojnacki (66274)schreibt: “oh CASP Badges, die Idee gefällt mir. Ich hab nun schon ein paar CASPs durchgecruncht und das wär doch was cooles vorzuzeigen. Ein ausgeprägter Badge für die Teilnahme an jedem CASP und die dann farblich unterscheiden, je nachdem wieviel gecruncht wurde, genau wie bei WCG. Ja, ich glaube das wär doch cool.”

25/05/10 transient (66318)antwortet: “Badges …. Wie wär’s mit diesem? Ein ’Predictor of the Day’ (Prädiktor des Tages) Badge, lol ( )”

04/06/10 Sean Kiely (66466)schreibt: “Dr Baker, es ist aufregend die Einzelheiten des weiteren Fortschritts zu hören betr. - Bindungen an Viren, danke Ihnen, dass sie mit den Updates fortfahren.

06/06/10 Sid Celery (66500) quotiert eigenen Post vom 19/05/10 (66195) betr. – Rosetta Aktuelles vorn auf der Boinc Stats Seite aufrechtzuerhalten um weitere Cruncher für das Projekt zu gewinnen und fügt folgendes dazu: - “Ich meine, es wäre es wert einen Hinweis auf Dr Baker’s letzte Journaleintragung* zu veröffentlichen. Und wenn es dort dann auch hin verpflanzt wird, liest es sich vielleicht als ein bischen Abwechslung anstelle vom Stromausfall anderer Projekte zu hören und kann dann mit dem Fortschrittsbericht von WCG konkurrieren. Praktische Fortschritte liest man immer gerne. Wenn’s keine Neuigkeiten zu lesen gibt, geht man vom Standpunkt aus, dass es da wohl keine Fortschritte gab … wo hier aber gerade das Gegenteil von wahr ist.”
*(Anm. Susanne: siehe hier 21.6.10 http://www.seti-germany.de/forum/ros...e-journal.html )

21/06/10 dcdc (66618) antwortet: “Ich meine es wäre eine gute Idee die Veröffentlichungen etwas mehr hervorzuheben.
- Ich schlage vor die Publikationsliste auf den neuesten Stand zu bringen (über den Link auf der Titelseite zu erreichen)
- Die ’About’ (‘Es geht um’) Überschrift auf der Titelseite aufzuspalten in ‘About*’ und ‘Research’ (Forschung)
*Es gäbe da vielleicht etwas Geeigneteres als ‘About’!?!
Der Forschungsteil, der für viele am wichtigsten ist, sollte im Scheinwerferlicht stehen, hebt sich aber momentan leider nicht genug ab."

21/06/10 Aegis Maelstrom (66619) antwortet: “Ich stimme dcdc zu.” Ich möchte erwägen eine neue Nachrichtenmeldung hier zu posten um die Aufmerksamkeit von Besuchern, Boinc Stats und anderen BOINC News Lesenden auf sich zu ziehen.
P.S. Meine aufrichtigen Glückwünsche an das ganze Team!”

21/06/10 JChojnacki (66629) antwortet: “Ich stimme vollkommen zu. Der Post vom 21.Juni 2010 sollte zur Nachrichtensparte auf der Homepage gefügt werden. Es ist ein besonders aufregender Post und hat die Vorteile des RSS feeds verdient. Gute Arbeit geleistet ”

23/06/10 Michael Gould (66647) schreibt: “Herzliche Glückwünsche an alle im Team für eure Leistungen und danke, dass ihr uns über solche Sachen informiert. Es ist schwer zu beschreiben, was solch ein Feedback für uns Cruncher bedeutet. Macht bitte so weiter!”

23/06/10 Michael G.R. (66654)schreibt: “Danke für das Update Dr Baker und Glückwünsche an alle R@h Beteiligten (Labor und auch Freiwillige)!”

26/06/10 Manuel Lupotto[UNIPV] (66698) antwortet: “Beglückwünschung zu euren Resultaten. Ich bin auch der Meinung, dass diese Ergebnisse gut sichtbar erscheinen sollten als gutes Beispiel der Wichtig – und Nützlichkeit des verteilten Rechnens. Ein Vorschlag: da nun die Seite mit den Veröffentlichungen alle Publikationen des Labors beeinhaltet, ist es schwierig daraus zu ersehen, ob und wieweit das verteilte Rechnen dort mitgewirkt hat. Es wäre praktischer denjenigen Rosetta @ Home Publikationen eine eigene gewittmete Seite zu geben, bei denen die Freiwilligen erheblich mitgewirkt haben.”

01/07/10 David Baker (66726) antwortet: - “Hallo Manuel, fast die ganze, in den Publikationen beschriebene, Arbeit meiner Gruppe ist direkt durch Rosetta@home Freiwillige impaktiert. Zum Beispiel wird die Energiefunktion, die wir in allen Tätigkeiten benutzen, durch Feedback von rosetta @ home stätig verbessert und diese Verbesserungen sind der Grundstein für die in den Veröffentlichungen beschriebenen Arbeiten.”

01/07/10 Manuel Lupotto[UNIPV] antwortet: - “Es freut mich zu wissen, dass alle Veröffentlichungen Beiträge von Freiwilligen beinhalten. Vielen Dank für ihre Antwort. “
.
EDIT :
.
beiträge vom 9 Juli - 12 Juli


Tom Philippart - Message 62150 - Posted 9 Jul 2009 19:56:17 UTC


Do you plan to mention the users who found the best predictions in your blog again and maybe in the papers and articles as you did some time ago?

May I also ask for a short WU description by someone of the Baker team? It would be interesting to know if WU xyz is crunching a flu target you posted about or if it is an application benchmark run, ...

Thanks :)

Tom Philippart - Message 62160 - Posted 10 Jul 2009 8:25:32 UTC - in response to Message ID 62150.



Do you plan to mention the users who found the best predictions in your blog again and maybe in the papers and articles as you did some time ago?

May I also ask for a short WU description by someone of the Baker team? It would be interesting to know if WU xyz is crunching a flu target you posted about or if it is an application benchmark run, ...

Thanks :)



an update of the "top preditctions" page would be nice too :)


Übersetzung: Susanne@seti.germany


Tom Philippart - Message 62150 - Posted 9 Jul 2009 19:56:17 UTC
Werden sie wieder die Beteiligten, die die besten Vorhersagen gefunden haben, in ihrem Blog, den Arbeiten oder Artikeln erwähnen, wie sie’s vor einiger Zeit gemacht haben?
Darf ich bitte um eine WU Beschreibung von jemandem im Baker Team bitten. Es wäre interessant zu wissen ob WU xyz ein Grippezielobjekt cruncht, so wie sie es geposted haben oder ob es ein Durchlauf des Applikationsmassstabs ist. … Danke
Vielleich könnte die Seite mit den besten Vorhersagen mal aktualisiert werden.

David Baker - Message 62206 - Posted 12 Jul 2009 17:32:46 UTC


Thank you for the suggestions! We will work on updating and reporting this week. Everybody here is so focused on research we do need reminders occasionally when we have fallen behind on reporting back to you all the exciting things that are happening!
.
EDIT :
.

Übersetzung: Susanne


Danke für deine Vorschläge! Wir werden das Aktualisieren und Berichterstatten diese Woche in Arbeit nehmen. Alle konzentrieren sich hier so auf die Forschung, dass wir ab und zu darin erinnert werden müssen, wenn wir mit dem Berichterstatten der aufregenden Dinge, die so passieren, zurückgefallen sind.


ejuel - Message 62389 - Posted 23 Jul 2009 13:45:57 UTC - in response to Message ID 62206.




Thank you for the suggestions! We will work on updating and reporting this week. Everybody here is so focused on research we do need reminders occasionally when we have fallen behind on reporting back to you all the exciting things that are happening!

Hi David,

Please see the middle of this thread where many of us have asked for over a year for better communication from RAH...

http://boinc.bakerlab.org/rosetta/forum_thread.php?id=4061&nowrap=true#54016

I would like to hear a reply from you by Tuesday, the 28th or I am pulling all my machines off this project.

Yes, I am that frustrated with the lack of respsonse and professionalism from this project.

-Eric

Übersetzung:Susanne


Hallo David,
Schau doch bitte mal in diesem Thread so im Mittelabschnitt nach, wo viele von uns seit einem Jahr um bessere Kommunikation von RAH gebeten haben …
http://boinc.bakerlab.org/rosetta/fo...rap=true#54016

Ich möchte darauf bitte vor Dienstag, d. 28. eine Antwort haben oder ich ziehe alle meine Maschinen von diesem Projekt ab. Ja, ich bin derartig wegen fehlendem Rückmelden und Professionalismus dieses Projektes frustriert
Eric


David Baker - Message 62407 - Posted 24 Jul 2009 5:47:45 UTC


Thank you for the pointer to this thread. I just posted an (apologetic) response, and now I will give an update on the work we are doing in my journal page.

Übersetzung von Susanne


Danke für den Threadhinweis. Ich habe gerade eine Entschuldigung geposted und werde nun eine Aktualisierung in meinem Journal betrefflich der momentanen Arbeit notieren.

dgnuff - Message 62410 - Posted 24 Jul 2009 8:56:01 UTC - in response to Message ID 62408.



Thank you for the pointer to this thread. I just posted an (apologetic) response, and now I will give an update on the work we are doing in my journal page.



The abstract of David Kim's paper that you posted raises the following question for me. He mentions that smaller proteins have been accurately modeled by Rosetta, but it appears there is a size limit, above which we don't yet have the necessary computing power.

Possibly taking a quote out of context, but approximately how large are the "Larger and more complex proteins" that are spoken of.

As an extension to this, and assuming there is a size limit, does that same size limit come into play for the reverse problem, trying to create a protein chain for a custom shape.

Keeping this in mind, for the proposed flu vaccine, and possibly for your proposed HIV vaccine, do you have any estimates of how many residues these will have, and where that count (again assuming it exists) is in relationship to the above limit.

All of which is a long and convoluted way of asking, "How close are we to having the necessary accuracy in Rosetta, and compute power from all our systems to be able to create the flu vaccine that you spoke of recently?"

Übersetzung von Susanne


Der Abstrakt von David Kim’s Arbeit, den du geposted hast, wirft für mich folgende Frage auf: - er erwähnt, dass kleinere Proteine akkurat von Rosetta modelliert würden, aber es scheint ein Grenzlimit zu geben, worüber hinaus wir noch nicht die benötigte Rechenpower haben.
Ich nehme vielleicht eine Quotierung aus dem Zusammenhang, aber wie gro? ungefähr sind die “grö?eren und komplizierteren Proteine” wovon hier geredet wird. Als Erweiterung dieser Frage, und angenommen, dass es ein Grenzlimit gibt, spielt das gleiche dann beim umgekehrten Problem eine Rolle, wo eine Proteinkette von einer gebräuchlichen Form entwickelt wird?
Berücksichtigen wir das auch bei dem geplanten Grippeimpfstoff und möglicherweise bei deinem geplanten HIV-Impfstoff, kannst du abschätzen wieviele Aminosäuren die haben werden und wie ist der Zusammenhang mit dem bereits erwähnten Limit (angenommen es gibt einen).
All dies ist ein langer und komplizierter Weg die Frage zu stellen: “Wie nah dran sind wir, die notwendige Genauigkeit und Rechenpower unserer gesamten Anlagen in Rosetta zu haben um imstande zu sein den Grippeimpfstoff, von dem du neulich gesprochen hattest, zu erzeugen?”
Beigefügtes Kommentar: - wenn es nicht genügend Rechenpower mit der jetzigen Crunchergemeinschaft gibt, wieviel mehr würde gebraucht um das Projekt auf das Niveau zu bringen um grö?ere und komplexere Proteine zu bewältigen.

Greg BE - Message 62413 - Posted 24 Jul 2009 12:35:43 UTC - in response to Message ID 62410.




Thank you for the pointer to this thread. I just posted an (apologetic) response, and now I will give an update on the work we are doing in my journal page.




The abstract of David Kim's paper that you posted raises the following question for me. He mentions that smaller proteins have been accurately modeled by Rosetta, but it appears there is a size limit, above which we don't yet have the necessary computing power.

Possibly taking a quote out of context, but approximately how large are the "Larger and more complex proteins" that are spoken of.

As an extension to this, and assuming there is a size limit, does that same size limit come into play for the reverse problem, trying to create a protein chain for a custom shape.

Keeping this in mind, for the proposed flu vaccine, and possibly for your proposed HIV vaccine, do you have any estimates of how many residues these will have, and where that count (again assuming it exists) is in relationship to the above limit.

All of which is a long and convoluted way of asking, "How close are we to having the necessary accuracy in Rosetta, and compute power from all our systems to be able to create the flu vaccine that you spoke of recently?"



Additional comment on the above - if there is not sufficient computing power available with the current group of crunchers, how much more is needed to bring the project up to the level to tackle the larger and more complex proteins?

Michael G.R. - Message 62415 - Posted 24 Jul 2009 15:54:38 UTC


One more question to add to those above:

Is the prediction of the shape of larger proteins limited computationally by the total aggregate FLOPS of the project as a whole, or is it also limited by the power of individual computers right now (for example, maybe the work unit of a larger protein would take 4 gigs of RAM and it would take much longer just to run one decoy)?

Übersetzung von Susanne


Und noch eine weitere Frage: -
Ist die Vorhersage der Form grö?erer Proteine rechnerisch von den gesamten FLOPS des ganzen Projektes begrenzt oder ist das auch durch die Rechenkraft einzelner Computer begrenzt (z. B. vielleicht bräuchte die WU eines grö?eren Proteins 4 GB RAM und es würde viel länger dauern um nur einen Decoy laufen zu lassen)?


David Baker - Message 62427 - Posted 25 Jul 2009 21:31:47 UTC


Good questions!

First, our ability to compute structures of larger proteins is limited by the total aggregate FLOPS of the project, rather than the power of individual machines.

Second, Rosetta@home's upper limit for predicting protein structures accurately using only the amino acid sequence of the protein is about 150 amino acids. But, as I've discussed previously in my journal, this limit can be overcome if there is even very limited experimental data available on the structure (for example, suppose you are searching for the lowest elevation point on Earth, and you are told that it is not in North America, or that it is in the Middle East; this isn't a huge amount of information but it still reduces the amount of searching a lot). Some of the work we are doing with Rosetta@home now is testing how high we can go in size if we have limited experimental data available, or if there is information from the structures of related proteins we can use.

Third, this limit for prediction does not carry over to the design problem, for example the design of swine flu blockers. we have successfully designed active enzymes with sizes over 300 amino acids, for example. this is because when we design a new function or activity, we can start with one of the many structures that have already been determined experimentally, and build the new function onto this structure.

Übersetzung Susanne


Gute Fragen!
Erstens, unsere Fähigkeit die Strukturen grö?erer Proteine zu berechnen ist eher von den gesamten FLOPS des Projektes begrenzt als der Kraft einzelner Computer.
Zweitens, Rosetta@home’s oberster Grenzwert Proteinstrukturen akkurat nur mit Hilfe der Aminosäuren vorherzusagen ist ungefähr 150 Aminosäuren. Aber, wie bereits in meinem Journal diskutiert, kann dieser Grenzwert überschritten werden wenn sehr begrenzte experimentelle Daten betr. der Struktur zur Verfügung stehen (z. B. stell dir vor du suchst nach der höchsten Erhebung der Erde und dir wird gesagt, dass sie nicht in Nordamerka sei oder dass sie im Mittleren Osten sei; das ist nicht gerade viel Information, aber es verringert doch die Suchaktion erheblich). Etwas, dass wir mit Rosetta@home momentan machen, ist zu testen, wieviel grö?er wir gehen können, wenn wir nur begrenzte experimentelle Daten zur Verfügung haben oder ob es Informationen verwandter Strukturen gibt, die wir benutzen können.
Drittens, dieses Vorhersagelimit wird nicht auf das Designproblem übertragen, z. B. das Design der Schweinegrippeblockierer. Wir haben beispielsweise aktive Enzyme erfolgreich mit Grö?en über 300 Aminosäuren designed. Darum, wenn wir eine neue Funktion oder Aktivität designen, beginnen wir mit einer der vielen Strukturen, die schon experimentell bestätigt wurden und bauen die neue Funktion auf diese Struktur.

Michael G.R. - Message 62540 - Posted 28 Jul 2009 4:52:20 UTC


Very interesting, thanks!

robertmiles - Message 62557 - Posted 28 Jul 2009 14:02:10 UTC - in response to Message ID 62410.



Thank you for the pointer to this thread. I just posted an (apologetic) response, and now I will give an update on the work we are doing in my journal page.




The abstract of David Kim's paper that you posted raises the following question for me. He mentions that smaller proteins have been accurately modeled by Rosetta, but it appears there is a size limit, above which we don't yet have the necessary computing power.



Would producing a version of minirosetta that runs in 64-bit node, and can therefore use more memory on machines that have enough, make it easier to handle the larger proteins? A separate pool of workunits might be needed for these, so the results for these usually don't need to be compared with running the same workunits with versions of minirosetta in 32-bit mode.

Also, producing a GPU version would give more computing power, but usually not more memory for each processor core.

Übersetzung Susanne


Würde die Handhabung grö?erer Proteine erleichtert, wenn eine Version der Minirosetta erzeugt würde, die im 64-Bit Modus lief und so mehr Memory derjenigen Maschinen nützte, die davon genug haben? Ein separater Vorrat an WUs könnte dafür bereitgestellt werden, sodass die Resultate dafür nicht mit denen verglichen werden müssen, die im 32-bit Modus der Minirosettaversionen laufen.
Auch würde die Produktion einer GPU Version mehr Rechenpower bringen, aber normalerweise nicht mehr Memory pro Prozessorkern.

ejuel - Message 62864 - Posted 10 Aug 2009 15:03:05 UTC


Hi David...can you please give us an update? See this post:


http://boinc.bakerlab.org/rosetta/forum_thread.php?id=4061&nowrap=true#62854

-Eric

l_mckeon - Message 66967 - Posted 21 Jul 2010 0:43:48 UTC


What are the implications of the new enzyme?

Briefly, what are the time and energy improvements over the standard reaction??

Übersetzung susanne


Was sind die Auswirkungen des neuen Enzyms?
Kurz gefasst, was sind die Zeit und Energieverbesserungen im Vergleich mit den normalen Reaktionen??

Gast09072017f
15.11.2010, 15:56
neue beiträge aus dem thread die übersetzung kommt von susanne@seti.germany


Message 68377 von Mad Max vom 4.11.10

Hello David.
It was interesting to see what is already 3 successful models, and not only one which was reported previously. But i have a supplementary question about the application of it:
If the protein was well designed and tightly bind to a target flu protein and block its work, why we are talking about using it only as a component for the diagnosis kits? But not directly - for treatment of flu? Or is it too mean, just in the more distant prospects of?
(As I understand the use of any new drug as a medicine is associated with long-term studies, tests, approvals, etc. While the use as diagnostics can be done fairly quickly, because no means long tests on animals and then humans, no risk to harm, etc)


Antwort von David Baker vom 13.11.10 Message 68608 posted in response to Message ID 68377.

You are absolutely right!! Since the time I wrote that post, our collaborators have obtained new data suggesting the designs may be useful as therapeutics. I'll post more on this as soon as the results are confirmed. you are also correct that the designs are pretty much ready to go now as diagnostics, but use as drugs would require a lot of testing which would take a long time to make sure they are safe, don't interact with other things in your body, etc.
____________

Übersetzung: - Message 68377 von Mad Max vom 4.11.10
Hallo David.
Es war interessant die 3 bereits erfolgreichen Modelle zu sehen und nicht nur das, worüber schon vorher berichtet wurde. Nur habe ich eine Zusatzfrage betrefflich deren Anwendung:
Wenn das Protein gut konzipiert ist und eng an das Zielgrippeprotein bindet und seine Arbeitsweise blockiert, warum reden wir davon es nur als Bestandteil eines Diagnosekits zu verwenden? Warum nicht direkt - zur Grippebekämpfung? Oder geht das momentan noch nicht, vielleicht aber in der Zukunft?
(So wie ich das verstehe ist die Anwendung neuer Medikamente mit langwieriger Forschung verbunden, Tests, Bestätigungen, usw, während die Anwendung in der Diagnose recht schnell vonstatten gehen kann, kein Risiko jemandem Schaden zuzufügen, denn eine Ablehnung würde Tests an Tieren und Menschen bedeuten, usw).

Antwort von David Baker vom 13.11.10 Message 68608
Du hast vollkommen Recht!! Seit ich den Post geschrieben habe, haben unsere Mitarbeiter neue Daten erhalten, welche darauf hinweisen, dass die Designs als Therapien nützlich sein könnten. Sobald mehr Ergebnisse bestätigt werden, werde ich das bekannt geben. Du hast auch Recht, dass die Designs so gut wie fertig sind um jetzt als Diagnostika eingesetzt zu werden, aber in der Anwendung als Medikamente würden viele Tests benötigt, was lange dauern würde, um zu versichern, dass sie zuverlässig sind und nicht mit anderen Dingen in eurem Körper reagieren.