2nd Gen AMD EPYC™ Processors Set New Standard for the Modern Datacenter with Record-Breaking Performance and Significant TCO Savings

—    AMD EPYC™ 7002 Series pro­ces­sors set 80 per­for­mance world records1, pro­vi­de 2X the per­for­mance com­pa­red to the pre­vious genera­ti­on2 and deli­ver an esti­ma­ted 25% to 50% lower TCO than com­pe­ti­ti­ve offe­rings3 —

—    Goog­le and Twit­ter join gro­wing list of custo­mers adop­ting AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors —

SANTA CLARA, Calif. 

At a launch event today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) was joi­ned by an expan­si­ve eco­sys­tem of dat­a­cen­ter part­ners and custo­mers to intro­du­ce the 2ndGenera­ti­on AMD EPYC™ fami­ly of pro­ces­sors that deli­ver per­for­mance lea­dership across a broad num­ber of enter­pri­se, cloud and high-per­for­mance com­pu­ting (HPC) workloads. 2nd Gen AMD EPYC™ pro­ces­sors fea­ture up to 64 “Zen 2” cores in lea­ding-edge 7nm pro­cess tech­no­lo­gy to deli­ver record-set­ting per­for­mance while hel­ping redu­ce total cost of ownership (TCO) by up to 50% across nume­rous workloads4. At the event, Goog­le and Twit­ter announ­ced new 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor deploy­ments and HPE and Leno­vo announ­ced imme­dia­te avai­la­bi­li­ty of new plat­forms.

Today, we set a new stan­dard for the modern dat­a­cen­ter with the launch of our 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors that deli­ver record-set­ting per­for­mance and signi­fi­cant­ly lower total cost of ownership across a broad set of workloads,” said Dr. Lisa Su, pre­si­dent and CEO, AMD. “Adop­ti­on of our new lea­dership ser­ver pro­ces­sors is acce­le­ra­ting with mul­ti­ple new enter­pri­se, cloud and HPC custo­mers choo­sing EPYC pro­ces­sors to meet their most deman­ding ser­ver com­pu­ting needs.

2nd Gen EPYC Processors Expand the AMD Datacenter Customer and Partner Ecosystem

At the launch event, several custo­mers and part­ners joi­ned AMD on sta­ge to dis­cuss new AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor offe­rings:

  • Goog­le announ­ced it has deploy­ed 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors in its inter­nal infra­st­ruc­tu­re pro­duc­tion dat­a­cen­ter envi­ron­ment and in late 2019 will sup­port new gene­ral-pur­po­se machi­nes powe­red by 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors on Goog­le Cloud Com­pu­te Engi­ne as well;
  • Twit­ter announ­ced it will deploy 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors across its dat­a­cen­ter infra­st­ruc­tu­re later this year, redu­cing TCO by 25%;
  • Micro­soft announ­ced the pre­view of new Azu­re vir­tu­al machi­nes for gene­ral pur­po­se app­li­ca­ti­ons, as well as limi­ted pre­views of cloud-based remo­te desk­tops and HPC workloads based on 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors today;
  • HPE announ­ced con­ti­nued sup­port of the AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor fami­ly with plans to trip­le their AMD-based port­fo­lio with a broad ran­ge of 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor-based sys­tems, inclu­ding the HPE Pro­Li­ant DL385 and HPE Pro­Li­ant DL325 ser­vers;
  • Cray announ­ced The Air Force Wea­ther Agen­cy will be using a Cray Shas­ta sys­tem with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors to pro­vi­de com­pre­hen­si­ve ter­restri­al and space wea­ther infor­ma­ti­on to the U.S. Air Force and Army;
  • Leno­vo announ­ced new solu­ti­ons that are spe­ci­fi­cal­ly built to take advan­ta­ge of the full ran­ge of enhan­ced capa­bi­li­ties found in the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors. Avail­ab­le today, the Think­Sys­tem SR655 and SR635 are ide­al solu­ti­ons for use cases such as video infra­st­ruc­tu­re, vir­tua­li­za­ti­on, soft­ware-defi­ned sto­rage and more, with excep­tio­nal ener­gy effi­ci­en­cy;
  • Dell Tech­no­lo­gies announ­ced the upco­m­ing avai­la­bi­li­ty of new­ly desi­gned ser­vers opti­mi­zed for 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors;
  • VMware and AMD announ­ced a clo­se col­la­bo­ra­ti­on to deli­ver sup­port for new secu­ri­ty and other fea­tures of the high-per­for­mance 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors wit­hin VMware vSphe­re.

AMD 2nd Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors will help us con­ti­nue to do what we do best in our dat­a­cen­ters: inno­va­te,” said Bart Sano, Goog­le vice pre­si­dent of Engi­nee­ring. “Its scala­b­le com­pu­te, memo­ry and I/O per­for­mance will expand our abi­li­ty to dri­ve inno­va­ti­on for­ward in our infra­st­ruc­tu­re and will give Goog­le Cloud custo­mers the fle­xi­bi­li­ty to choo­se the best VM for their workloads.”

Designed for Modern Workloads: Enterprise, Cloud and HPC

Second Gen AMD EPYC™ pro­ces­sors are spe­ci­fi­cal­ly desi­gned for modern dat­a­cen­ter workloads, pro­vi­ding custo­mers an ide­al com­bi­na­ti­on of fea­tures to help unlock per­for­mance and rede­fi­ne eco­no­mics in vir­tua­li­za­ti­on, cloud, HPC and enter­pri­se app­li­ca­ti­ons.

For the enter­pri­se dat­a­cen­ter, 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors offer up to 83% bet­ter Java app­li­ca­ti­on per­for­mance5, up to 43% bet­ter SAP SD 2 Tier per­for­mance6 than the com­pe­ti­ti­on and pro­vi­de world record per­for­mance on Real Time Ana­ly­tics with Hadoop7

For modern cloud and vir­tua­li­za­ti­on workloads, 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors deli­ver world record vir­tua­li­za­ti­on8 per­for­mance that rede­fi­nes dat­a­cen­ter eco­no­mics.

For HPC, 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors offer an unmat­ched com­bi­na­ti­on of record-set­ting floa­ting point per­for­mance9 and the most DRAM memo­ry10 and I/O band­width in its class to super­char­ge HPC workloads, inclu­ding up to 2x bet­ter per­for­mance in com­pu­ta­tio­nal flu­id dyna­mics11 and up to 72% hig­her per­for­mance struc­tu­ral ana­ly­sis12.

AMD Design Innovation Brings Breakthrough Architecture for the Datacenter

The 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor com­bi­nes lea­dership per­for­mance, archi­tec­tu­re and secu­ri­ty fea­tures to meet the most deman­ding chal­len­ges facing the dat­a­cen­ter. High­lights of the AMD EPYC 7002 genera­ti­on pro­ces­sor fami­ly inclu­de:

  • Lea­dership Per­for­mance: Fea­turing up to 64 “Zen 2” cores per SOC, 2nd Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors deli­ver up to 23% more inst­ruc­tions per clock (IPC) per core on ser­ver workloads13 and up to 4X more L3 Cache com­pa­red to the pre­vious genera­ti­on.
  • Lea­dership Archi­tec­tu­re: The next-genera­ti­on AMD Infi­ni­ty Archi­tec­tu­re pushes the bounda­ries for x86 per­for­mance and com­pu­te capa­bi­li­ties, giving custo­mers access to the most I/O14 and memo­ry band­width15 in its class, inclu­ding PCIe Genera­ti­on 4, to unleash the very latest in ser­ver per­for­mance.
  • Lea­dership Secu­ri­ty Fea­tures: Deli­vering “har­den­ed at the core” fea­tures based on a sili­con embed­ded secu­ri­ty sub­sys­tem and advan­ced secu­ri­ty fea­tures like Secu­re Memo­ry Encryp­ti­on and Secu­re Encryp­ted Vir­tua­li­za­ti­on that help custo­mers guard their most important assets and data.

A Growing Partner Ecosystem

The AMD EPYC eco­sys­tem con­ti­nues to grow with more than 60 part­ners sup­por­ting the launch on day one. The broad part­ner eco­sys­tem inclu­ding ODMs like Giga­byte and QCT, IHVs like Broad­com, Micron and Xilinx, and broad ope­ra­ting sys­tem sup­port inclu­ding Micro­soft and mul­ti­ple Linux dis­tri­bu­ti­ons. For Linux Cano­ni­cal, Red­Hat and SUSE col­la­bo­ra­ted with AMD to test and vali­da­te solu­ti­ons based on the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors for a wide ran­ge of dat­a­cen­ter use cases. This vali­da­ti­on hel­ped the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor achie­ve more than 2X plat­forms in deve­lop­ment com­pa­red to the 1st Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors.

You can read more about the expan­ding AMD EPYC eco­sys­tem and the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor here at the AMD blog.  

The 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor-based sys­tems are avail­ab­le now from the AMD EPYC eco­sys­tem part­ners. Learn more about whe­re to purcha­se tho­se sys­tems here.

Supporting Partner and Customer Quotes

Twit­ter is com­mit­ted to redu­cing our envi­ron­men­tal impact of our dat­a­cen­ters by fin­ding inno­va­ti­ve ways to increa­se effi­ci­en­cy. The 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor pro­vi­des us the sweet spot of per­for­mance and ener­gy con­sump­ti­on that we need to honor that com­mit­ment, while sup­por­ting the high traf­fic volu­me on our plat­form,” Jen­ni­fer Fra­ser, seni­or direc­tor of Engi­nee­ring at Twit­ter. “Using the AMD EPYC 7702 pro­ces­sor we can sca­le out our com­pu­te clus­ters with more cores in less space using less power, which trans­la­tes to a 25% lower TCO for Twit­ter.”

Custo­mers today are asking for secu­re, workload-opti­mi­zed ser­vers that can dri­ve new expe­ri­en­ces and value for their custo­mers,” said Jus­tin Hotard, seni­or vice pre­si­dent and gene­ral mana­ger, Volu­me Glo­bal Busi­ness Unit at HPE. “With the addi­ti­on of new 2nd Gen AMD EPYC™-equipped ser­vers to our port­fo­lio, HPE deli­vers an unpre­ce­den­ted num­ber of world-record per­for­mance and effi­ci­en­cy results ali­gned to a wide ran­ge of cloud and dat­a­cen­ter workloads, and unmat­ched secu­ri­ty capa­bi­li­ties. We will con­ti­nue to deli­ver inno­va­ti­ve pro­duc­ts with AMD and look for­ward to buil­ding on our long­stan­ding col­la­bo­ra­ti­ve rela­ti­ons­hip.”

As we enter a new era of com­pu­ting, the exas­ca­le era, we’re see­ing new workloads, new infra­st­ruc­tu­re, a new way of thin­king – and this requi­res capa­bi­li­ties and per­for­mance like we get from our next-genera­ti­on Shas­ta super­com­pu­ter com­bi­ned with AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors,” said Peter Unga­ro, pre­si­dent and CEO at Cray. “Sin­ce Cray announ­ced sup­port for AMD pro­ces­sors in our sys­tems over a year ago, we’ve boo­ked almost $800 mil­li­on in AMD EPYC-based sys­tems. With the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors con­nec­ted via our new Slingshot sys­tem inter­con­nect, we’re able to deli­ver the per­for­mance our custo­mers requi­re for the exas­ca­le era.”

Today, through our expan­ded rela­ti­ons­hip with AMD, we are pushing bounda­ries on per­for­mance and effi­ci­en­cy in ways that will acce­le­ra­te our custo­mers’ intel­li­gent trans­for­ma­ti­on. Our new Think­Sys­tem solu­ti­ons, powe­red by next-genera­ti­on AMD EPYC™ 7002 Series pro­ces­sors, allow users to store and access huge amounts of data,” said Doug Fisher, chief ope­ra­ting offi­cer and seni­or vice pre­si­dent of Busi­ness Units, DCG Solu­ti­ons, Leno­vo. “The grea­ter sto­rage, pro­ces­sing and gra­phics capa­bi­li­ties unlock the poten­ti­al of enhan­ced video secu­ri­ty and other cri­ti­cal app­li­ca­ti­ons for edge and vir­tua­li­zed envi­ron­ments. A per­fect examp­le is video secu­ri­ty in smart city, cam­pus and mass tran­sit envi­ron­ments whe­re public safe­ty orga­ni­za­ti­ons need that addi­tio­nal com­pu­ting power in con­fi­ned spaces using less ener­gy so they can bet­ter moni­tor and ana­ly­ze poten­ti­al thre­ats.”

As workloads beco­me more deman­ding and com­plex, Dell Tech­no­lo­gies is focu­sed on hel­ping orga­ni­za­ti­ons suc­ceed in dyna­mic envi­ron­ments using inno­va­ti­ve and indus­try-lea­ding ser­ver designs,” said Ravi Pen­de­kan­ti, seni­or vice pre­si­dent of pro­duct manage­ment, Ser­ver & Infra­st­ruc­tu­re Sys­tems, Dell Tech­no­lo­gies. “Through clo­se col­la­bo­ra­ti­on with AMD, we are addres­sing the demands of tra­di­tio­nal, vir­tua­li­zed, hybrid and mul­ti-cloud workloads with a broad port­fo­lio of PowerEdge ser­vers, inclu­ding new­ly desi­gned ser­vers opti­mi­zed for 2nd Genera­ti­on AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors.”

VMware and AMD’s ongo­ing engi­nee­ring col­la­bo­ra­ti­on is focu­sed on deli­vering opti­mal app­li­ca­ti­on per­for­mance and secu­ri­ty for our mutu­al custo­mers,” said Krish Pra­sad, seni­or vice pre­si­dent and gene­ral mana­ger, Cloud Plat­form Busi­ness Unit, VMware. “We both see the value in dri­ving secu­ri­ty deeper into the infra­st­ruc­tu­re espe­ci­al­ly as modern IT infra­st­ruc­tu­re beco­mes more dis­tri­bu­t­ed. The Secu­re Encryp­ted Vir­tua­li­za­ti­on fea­ture in the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sor will help pro­tect custo­mers’ cri­ti­cal data across the mul­ti-site dat­a­cen­ter fabric. Com­bi­ned with AMD’s legen­da­ry pro­ces­sor per­for­mance, we expect our mutu­al custo­mers will be able to gain effi­ci­en­ci­es and secu­ri­ty capa­bi­li­ties to power their workloads.”

2nd Gen AMD EPYC™ Processor Stack

Model # Cores Threads Base Freq (GHz) Max Boost Freq (GHz)16 Default TDP (w) L3 Cache (MB) 1Ku

Pri­cing

7742 64 128 2.25 3.40 225w17 256 $6,950
7702 64 128 2.00 3.35 200w 256 $6,450
7702P 64 128 2.00 3.35 200w 256 $4,425
7642 48 96 2.30 3.30 225w18 256 $4,775
7552 48 96 2.20 3.30 200w 192 $4,025
7542 32 64 2.90 3.40 225w19 128 $3,400
7502 32 64 2.50 3.35 180w 128 $2,600
7502P 32 64 2.50 3.35 180w 128 $2,300
7452 32 64 2.35 3.35 155w 128 $2,025
7402 24 48 2.80 3.35 180w 128 $1,783
7402P 24 48 2.80 3.35 180w 128 $1,250
7352 24 48 2.30 3.20 155w 128 $1,350
7302 16 32 3.00 3.30 155w 128 $978
7302P 16 32 3.00 3.30 155w 128 $825
7282 16 32 2.80 3.20 120w 64 $650
7272 12 24 2.90 3.20 120w 64 $625
7262 8 16 3.20 3.40 155w 128 $575
7252 8 16 3.10 3.20 120w 64 $475
7232P 8 16 3.10 3.20 120w 32 $450

Supporting Resources

About AMD

For 50 years, AMD has dri­ven inno­va­ti­on in high-per­for­mance com­pu­ting, gra­phics and visua­li­za­ti­on tech­no­lo­gies — the buil­ding blocks for gaming, immer­si­ve plat­forms and the dat­a­cen­ter. Hund­reds of mil­li­ons of con­su­mers, lea­ding For­tu­ne 500 busi­nes­ses and cut­ting-edge sci­en­ti­fic rese­arch faci­li­ties around the world rely on AMD tech­no­lo­gy dai­ly to impro­ve how they live, work and play. AMD employees around the world are focu­sed on buil­ding gre­at pro­duc­ts that push the bounda­ries of what is pos­si­ble. For more infor­ma­ti­on about how AMD is enab­ling today and inspi­ring tomor­row, visit the AMD (NASDAQ: AMDweb­siteblogFace­book and Twit­ter pages.

Cautionary Statement  

This press release con­tains for­ward-loo­king state­ments con­cer­ning Advan­ced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) inclu­ding the fea­tures, func­tio­n­a­li­ty, avai­la­bi­li­ty, timing, deploy­ment and expec­ta­ti­ons of AMD’s future pro­duc­ts, inclu­ding the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC ser­ver pro­ces­sor fami­ly, which are made pur­suant to the Safe Har­bor pro­vi­si­ons of the Pri­va­te Secu­ri­ties Liti­ga­ti­on Reform Act of 1995. For­ward-loo­king state­ments are com­mon­ly iden­ti­fied by words such as “would,” “intends,” “belie­ves,” “expec­ts,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “intends,” “plans,” “pro for­ma,” “esti­ma­tes,” “anti­ci­pa­tes,” or the nega­ti­ve of the­se words and phra­ses, other varia­ti­ons of the­se words and phra­ses or com­pa­ra­ble ter­mi­no­lo­gy. Inves­tors are cau­tio­ned that the for­ward-loo­king state­ments in this docu­ment are based on cur­rent beliefs, assump­ti­ons and expec­ta­ti­ons, speak only as of the date of this docu­ment and invol­ve risks and uncer­tain­ties that could cau­se actu­al results to dif­fer mate­ri­al­ly from cur­rent expec­ta­ti­ons. Such state­ments are sub­ject to cer­tain known and unknown risks and uncer­tain­ties, many of which are dif­fi­cult to pre­dict and gene­ral­ly bey­ond AMD’s con­trol, that could cau­se actu­al results and other future events to dif­fer mate­ri­al­ly from tho­se expres­sed in, or implied or pro­jec­ted by, the for­ward-loo­king infor­ma­ti­on and state­ments. Mate­ri­al fac­tors that could cau­se actu­al results to dif­fer mate­ri­al­ly from cur­rent expec­ta­ti­ons inclu­de, wit­hout limi­ta­ti­on, the fol­lo­wing: Intel Corporation’s domi­nan­ce of the micropro­ces­sor mar­ket and its aggres­si­ve busi­ness prac­tices; the abi­li­ty of  GLOBALFOUNDRIES Inc. (GF) to satis­fy AMD’s manu­fac­tu­ring requi­re­ments; the abi­li­ty of third par­ty manu­fac­tures to manu­fac­tu­re AMD’s pro­duc­ts on a time­ly basis in suf­fi­ci­ent quan­ti­ties and using com­pe­ti­ti­ve tech­no­lo­gies; the abi­li­ty of third par­ty manu­fac­tu­rers  to achie­ve expec­ted manu­fac­tu­ring yields for AMD’s pro­duc­ts;  AMD’s abi­li­ty to intro­du­ce pro­duc­ts on a time­ly basis with fea­tures and per­for­mance levels that pro­vi­de value to its custo­mers while sup­por­ting and coin­ci­ding with signi­fi­cant indus­try tran­si­ti­ons; AMD’s ina­bi­li­ty to gene­ra­te suf­fi­ci­ent reve­nue and ope­ra­ting cash flow or obtain exter­nal finan­cing that may adver­se­ly impact its plan­ned invest­ments in rese­arch and deve­lop­ment or other stra­te­gic invest­ments; the loss of a signi­fi­cant custo­mer; AMD’s abi­li­ty to gene­ra­te reve­nue from its semi-custom SoC pro­duc­ts; glo­bal eco­no­mic and mar­ket uncer­tain­ty may adver­se­ly impact AMD’s busi­ness and ope­ra­ting results; AMD’s world­wi­de ope­ra­ti­ons are sub­ject to poli­ti­cal, legal and eco­no­mic risks and natu­ral dis­as­ters; poten­ti­al secu­ri­ty vul­nera­bi­li­ties that could have a mate­ri­al adver­se effect on AMD; poten­ti­al IT outa­ges, data loss, data breaches and cyber-attacks; AMD’s  abi­li­ty to gene­ra­te suf­fi­ci­ent cash to ser­vice its debt obli­ga­ti­ons or meet its working capi­tal requi­re­ments; AMD’s lar­ge amount of indeb­ted­ness could adver­se­ly affect its finan­ci­al posi­ti­on and pre­vent it from imple­men­ting its stra­te­gy or ful­fil­ling its con­trac­tu­al obli­ga­ti­ons; the restric­tions impo­sed by agree­ment gover­ning AMD’s notes and its secu­red revol­ving faci­li­ty; the com­pe­ti­ti­ve mar­kets in which AMD’s pro­duc­ts are sold; the poten­ti­al dilu­ti­ve effect of the 2.125% Con­ver­ti­ble Seni­or Notes due 2026 if con­ver­ted; uncer­tain­ties invol­ving the orde­ring and ship­ment of AMD’s pro­duc­ts; the mar­ket con­di­ti­ons of the indus­tries in which AMD pro­duc­ts are sold; AMD’s reli­an­ce on third-par­ty intel­lec­tu­al pro­per­ty to design and intro­du­ce new pro­duc­ts in a time­ly man­ner; AMD’s reli­an­ce on third-par­ty com­pa­nies for the design, manu­fac­tu­re and sup­ply of mother­boards, soft­ware and other com­pu­ter plat­form com­pon­ents; AMD’s reli­an­ce on Micro­soft Cor­po­ra­ti­on and other soft­ware ven­dors’ sup­port to design and deve­lop soft­ware to run on AMD’s pro­duc­ts; AMD’s reli­an­ce on third-par­ty dis­tri­bu­tors and add-in-board part­ners; future impairments of good­will and tech­no­lo­gy licen­se purcha­ses; AMD’s abi­li­ty to attract and retain qua­li­fied per­son­nel; AMD’s abi­li­ty to repurcha­se its out­stan­ding debt in the event of a chan­ge of con­trol; the cycli­cal natu­re of the semi­con­duc­tor indus­try; future acqui­si­ti­ons, dive­s­ti­tures, joint ven­tures and/or invest­ments could adver­se­ly affect AMD’s busi­ness; modi­fi­ca­ti­on or inter­rup­ti­on of AMD’s inter­nal busi­ness pro­ces­ses and infor­ma­ti­on sys­tems may dis­rupt its busi­ness, pro­ces­ses and inter­nal con­trols; the avai­la­bi­li­ty of essen­ti­al equip­ment, mate­ri­als or manu­fac­tu­ring pro­ces­ses; com­pa­ti­bi­li­ty of AMD’s pro­duc­ts with some or all indus­try-stan­dard soft­ware and hard­ware; costs rela­ted to defec­tive pro­duc­ts; the effi­ci­en­cy of AMD’s sup­ply chain as it responds to chan­ges in custo­mer demand for its pro­duc­ts; AMD’s abi­li­ty to rely on third par­ty sup­ply-chain logistics func­tions; AMD’s stock pri­ce vola­ti­li­ty; unfa­vor­able cur­ren­cy exchan­ge rate fluc­tua­ti­ons could adver­se­ly affect AMD; AMD’s abi­li­ty to effec­tively con­trol the sales of its pro­duc­ts on the gray mar­ket; AMD’s abi­li­ty to ade­qua­te­ly pro­tect its tech­no­lo­gy or other intel­lec­tu­al pro­per­ty in the United Sta­tes and abroad; cur­rent and future claims and liti­ga­ti­on; and envi­ron­men­tal laws, con­flict mine­rals-rela­ted pro­vi­si­ons and other laws or regu­la­ti­ons that could result in addi­tio­nal costs and lia­bi­li­ties. Inves­tors are urged to review in detail the risks and uncer­tain­ties in AMD’s Secu­ri­ties and Exchan­ge Com­mis­si­on filings, inclu­ding but not limi­ted to AMD’s Quar­ter­ly Report on Form 10‑Q for the quar­ter ended June 29, 2019.

 
FOOTNOTES
 

AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, EPYC, and com­bi­na­ti­ons the­re­of, are trade­marks of Advan­ced Micro Devices, Inc. PCIe is a regis­te­red trade­mark of PCI-SIG cor­po­ra­ti­on. Other names are for infor­ma­tio­nal pur­po­ses only and may be trade­marks of their respec­tive owners.

  1. For a com­ple­te list of world records see http://amd.com/worldrecords.  ROM-169
  2. Results as of 8/7/2019 using SPECrate®2017_int_base. The EPYC 7742 2P score is 654 on the SPECrate®2017_int_base, https://spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q3/cpu2017-20190722–16242.html.  EPYC 7601 2P score of 304 results at http://spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q2/cpu2017-20190411–11817.pdf.  654 / 304 = 2.15 or 2x hig­her inte­ger per­for­mance for the EPYC 7742. SPEC®, SPE­Cra­te® and SPEC CPU® are regis­te­red trade­marks of the Stan­dard Per­for­mance Eva­lua­ti­on Cor­po­ra­ti­on. See www.spec.org for more infor­ma­ti­on. ROM-37
  3. Based on 25% TCO impro­ve­ment clai­med by Twit­ter in EPYC Hori­zon pre­sen­ta­ti­on 8.7.2019; and AMD esti­ma­ted TCO impro­ve­ment of up to and 50% TCO in vir­tua­li­zed infra­st­ruc­tu­re. TCO‑3
  4. Com­pa­ri­son results cal­cu­la­ted by AMD based on a hypo­the­ti­cal sce­n­a­rio hos­ting 2,560 vir­tu­al machi­nes on 2‑socket Intel Xeon 6242 (32 total cores) based sys­tems ver­sus AMD EPYC7702P (64 total cores) based No Com­pro­mi­se Sin­gle Socket Sys­tems, exclu­ding soft­ware app­li­ca­ti­on costs.  Each vir­tu­al machi­ne is allo­ca­ted one core and 8GB of DRAM, resul­ting in 80 Intel based sys­tems (2,560/32) and 40 AMD EPYC based sys­tems (2,560/64).  Sys­tem Con­fi­gu­ra­ti­ons:  Intel Xeon based ser­vers in 2U Rack Mount chas­sis, with (2) Intel® Xeon® Gold 6242 2.8GHz base fre­quen­cy, 16 cores/32 threads, (16) 16GB RDIMM DDR4 2933MT/s, Dual Rank DIMMs, (1) 480GB SSD SAS Mix Use dri­ve, one dual port 10GbE ether­net adap­ter, dual hot swap power sup­plies w/cables, and OEM stan­dard war­ran­ty with esti­ma­ted pri­ce of $21,196 each for a total hard­ware acqui­si­ti­on pri­ce of $1,695,680.  AMD EPYC based ser­vers inclu­de — (40) 1U Rack Mount chas­sis with (1) AMD EPYC 7702P 2.0GHz base fre­quen­cy, 64 cores/128 threads, (16) 32GB RDIMM DDR4 2933MT/s, Dual Rank DIMMs, (1) 480GB SSD SAS Mix Use dri­ve, one dual port 10GbE ether­net adap­ter, dual hot swap power sup­plies w/cables, and  OEM stan­dard war­ran­ty with esti­ma­ted pri­ce of $23,696 each for a total hard­ware acqui­si­ti­on pri­ce of $947,840.  Esti­ma­ted Sys­tem Pri­cing: AMD Esti­ma­ted Pri­cing based on select OEM list pri­cing as of 7/30/2019 for Intel based sys­tems and AMD pro­jec­ted OEM list pri­cing as of 8/7/2019 for AMD EPYC based sys­tems. Pri­cing is an AMD esti­ma­te only – actu­al sys­tem pri­cing will vary by sys­tem and by sel­ler.  Power cost esti­ma­te is an inter­nal AMD esti­ma­te based on Intel Xeon based sys­tem input power — 498 watts, AMD EPYC-based sys­tem input power — 389 watts elec­tri­ci­ty cost cal­cu­la­ted at $0.12/kw/hr with an assu­med PUE of 2.0.  Intel Xeon power cost/server/year is esti­ma­ted at $1,047, AMD EPYC power cost/server/year is esti­ma­ted at $818 for a three year total power cost of  $251,280 and  $98,040 for an esti­ma­ted total power savings of 61%.  Dat­a­cen­ter space costs inclu­de 160 U’s for Intel Xeon-based Sys­tems or 4 Rack Cabi­nets and 40 U’s for AMD EPYC-based Sys­tems or 1 Rack Cabi­net – AMD inter­nal esti­ma­te of Data Cen­ter space cost of $19,053 per cabi­net per year results in 3 year space costs of $228,636 and $57,159 respec­tively – a 75% savings.  Ser­ver Admi­nis­tra­ti­on cost is cal­cu­la­ted with an esti­ma­te of $85,795 per ser­ver admi­nis­tra­tor with a ratio of one ser­ver admi­nis­tra­tor per 30 ser­vers resul­ting in 3 year esti­ma­ted admi­nis­tra­ti­on costs of $686,360 for 80 Intel Xeon-based Sys­tems and $343,180 for 40 AMD EPYC-based sys­tems – 50% savings.  Licen­sing costs are cal­cu­la­ted using VMware vSphe­re Enter­pri­se Plus licen­sed per socket and pri­ced as of 7/28/2019 on www.cdw.com at $3,612 each for a total 3‑year cost of $577,920 for (80) Intel Xeon-based 2 socket sys­tems and $144,480 for (40) AMD EPYC No Com­pro­mi­se Sin­gle Socket-based Sys­tems.   Total esti­ma­ted 3 Year TCO as a result is $3,439,876 for Intel-based Sys­tems and $1,590,699 for AMD EPYC-based sys­tems resul­ting in an esti­ma­ted TCO/VM/YR of $448 and $207 respec­tively – a 54% savings inclu­ding vir­tua­li­za­ti­on manage­ment soft­ware licen­ses but exclu­ding other soft­ware costs.  This sce­n­a­rio con­tains many assump­ti­ons and esti­ma­tes and, while based on AMD inter­nal rese­arch and best appro­xi­ma­ti­ons, should be con­si­de­red an examp­le for infor­ma­ti­on pur­po­ses only, and not used as a basis for decisi­on making over actu­al tes­ting. TCO‑2
  5. A 2P EPYC 7742 powe­red ser­ver has a World Record 2P SPEC­jb­b2015-Mul­tiJVM Max max-jOPS score of 355,121 (SPEC­jb­b2015-Mul­tiJVM Cri­ti­cal scored 151,270 cri­ti­cal-jOPS), http://www.spec.org/jbb2015/results/res2019q3/jbb2015-20190717–00460.html as of August 7, 2019. The hig­hest pre­vious 2P max-jOPS score is 194,068 (SPEC­jb­b2015-Mul­tiJVM Cri­ti­cal scored 53,616 cri­ti­cal-jOPS) by an Intel 8280 ser­ver, https://www.spec.org/jbb2015/results/res2019q2/jbb2015-20190313–00374.html. SPEC® and SPEC­jbb® are regis­te­red trade­marks of the Stan­dard Per­for­mance Eva­lua­ti­on Cor­po­ra­ti­on. See www.spec.org for more infor­ma­ti­on. ROM-107
  6. An EPYC™ 7702 powe­red ser­ver has a World Record x86 2P SAP SD® 2 tier with Win­dows® Ser­ver  score of 45,600 on Aug 7, 2019, https://www.sap.com/dmc/benchmark/2019/Cert19044, that is 43% (45600/ 31900 = 1.429) hig­her than the pre­vious #1,  an Intel Pla­ti­num 8180 powe­red ser­ver with a score of 31,900, https://www.sap.com/dmc/benchmark/2017/Cert17028.pdf.  SAP® SD scores can be found at https://www.sap.com/dmc/exp/2018-benchmark-directory/#/sd, July 31, 2019.  More infor­ma­ti­on on SAP Stan­dard App­li­ca­ti­on Bench­marks go to https://www.sap.com/about/benchmark.html. ROM-128; An EPYC™ 7702 powe­red ser­ver has a World Record x86 2P SAP SD® 2 tier score of 45,600 on Aug 7, 2019, https://www.sap.com/dmc/benchmark/2019/Cert19044, that is 28% (45600/ 35505 = 1.284) hig­her than the pre­vious #1,  an Intel Pla­ti­num 8280 powe­red ser­ver with a score of 35,505, https://www.sap.com/dmc/benchmark/2019/Cert19026.pdf.  SAP® SD scores can be found at https://www.sap.com/dmc/exp/2018-benchmark-directory/#/sd, July 31, 2019.  More infor­ma­ti­on on SAP Stan­dard App­li­ca­ti­on Bench­marks go to https://www.sap.com/about/benchmark.html. ROM-129
  7. Results as of 8/7/2019. EPYC7502P result published at TPC web­site, http://www.tpc.org/5533. Pre­vious best published result on the TPC web­site at http://www.tpc.org/tpcx-hs/results/tpcxhs_advanced_sort.asp?version=2. TPC and TPC Bench­mark are regis­te­red trade­marks of the Tran­sac­tion Pro­ces­sing Per­for­mance Coun­cil. ROM-162
  8. A 2P EPYC 7702 powe­red ser­ver has SPECvirt_sc2013 score of 5451.2 and 305 VMs, https://www.spec.org/virt_sc2013/results/res2019q3/virt_sc2013-20190716–00120-perf.html as of August 7, 2019. The next hig­hest score is a 2P Intel Pla­ti­num 8180 ser­ver with a score of 3376 and 189 VMs, https://www.spec.org/virt_sc2013/results/res2017q4/virt_sc2013-20171017–00098-perf.html as of July 28, 2019. SPEC® and SPECvirt® are regis­te­red trade­marks of the Stan­dard Per­for­mance Eva­lua­ti­on Cor­po­ra­ti­on. See www.spec.org for more infor­ma­ti­on. ROM-99.
  9. Based on SPECrate®2017 peak inte­ger scores. A 2P EPYC™ 7742 pro­ces­sor powe­red ser­ver has hig­her SPECrate®2017_int_peak score of 749 and a base score of 682 as of August 7, 2019, http:/spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q3/cpu2017-20190722–16242.html. The next high­test int_peak score with a 2P Intel Pla­ti­num 9282 of 676 and a base score of 643, http://spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q3/cpu2017-20190624–15369.pdf, on July 28, 2019. SPEC®, SPE­Cra­te® and SPEC CPU® are regis­te­red trade­marks of the Stan­dard Per­for­mance Eva­lua­ti­on Cor­po­ra­ti­on. See www.spec.org for more infor­ma­ti­on. ROM-114.
  10. Each 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors sup­port up to 4TB of DRAM.  Intel Scala­b­le pro­ces­sors sup­port up to 2TB with Pla­ti­num 8200 and 1TB with the 9200 pro­ces­sors per ark.intel.com, July 9, 2019. ROM-39
  11. Based on AMD inter­nal tes­ting of ANSYS FLUENT 19.1, lm6000_16m bench­mark, as of July 17, 2019 using a 2P EPYC 7742 powe­red refe­rence ser­ver ver­sus a 2P Xeon Pla­ti­num 8280 powe­red ser­ver. Results may vary. ROM-77
  12. Based on AMD inter­nal tes­ting of Alta­ir RADIOSS 2018, T10M bench­mark, as of July 17, 2019 using a 2P EPYC 7742 powe­red refe­rence ser­ver ver­sus a 2P Xeon Pla­ti­num 8280 powe­red ser­ver. Results may vary. Class based on indus­try-stan­dard pin-based (LGA) X86 pro­ces­sors. ROM-55
  13. Based on AMD inter­nal tes­ting, average per thread per­for­mance impro­ve­ment at ISO-fre­quen­cy on a 32-core, 64-thread, 2nd genera­ti­on AMD EPYC™ plat­form as com­pa­red to 32-core 64-thread 1st genera­ti­on AMD EPYC™ plat­form mea­su­red on a selec­ted set of workloads inclu­ding sub-com­pon­ents of SPEC CPU® 2017_int and  rep­re­sen­ta­ti­ve ser­ver workloads. ROM-236
  14. Based on pro­ces­sor lanes mul­ti­plied by PCIe® band­width. PCIe 4 = 16 GB/s link band­width vs. PCIe 3 = 8 GB/s. ROM-21
  15. EPYC™ 7002 series has 8 memo­ry chan­nels, sup­por­ting 3200 MHz DIMMs yiel­ding 204.8 GB/s of band­width vs. the same class of Intel Scala­b­le Gen 2 pro­ces­sors with only 6 memo­ry chan­nels and sup­por­ting 2933 MHz DIMMs yiel­ding 140.8 GB/s of band­width. 204.8 / 140.8 = 1.454545 — 1.0 = .45 or 45% more.  AMD EPYC has 45% more band­width. Class based on indus­try-stan­dard pin-based (LGA) X86 pro­ces­sors. ROM-11
  16. Maxi­mum sin­gle-core fre­quen­cy at which the pro­ces­sor is capa­ble of ope­ra­ting.
  17. Mother­boards desi­gned for 1st Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors may not be com­pa­ti­ble with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors with a TDP grea­ter than 200 watts.  Con­tact the ser­ver manu­fac­tu­rer to con­firm com­pa­ti­bi­li­ty.  ROM-07
  18. Mother­boards desi­gned for 1st Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors may not be com­pa­ti­ble with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors with a TDP grea­ter than 200 watts.  Con­tact the ser­ver manu­fac­tu­rer to con­firm com­pa­ti­bi­li­ty.  ROM-07
  19. Mother­boards desi­gned for 1st Gen EPYC pro­ces­sors may not be com­pa­ti­ble with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC pro­ces­sors with a TDP grea­ter than 200 watts.  Con­tact the ser­ver manu­fac­tu­rer to con­firm com­pa­ti­bi­li­ty.  ROM-07